A Pillion’s Leh Travelogue: Day Fo4r ‘Pang to Karu’

The morning sun was a welcome feeling as we got up the next day at Pang. Although Pang is at a height of more than 15000 ft, it is a major stopping point on the Manali-Leh highway. Travellers can be assured of both food and accommodation here. There are always a couple of parachute tented camps with necessary supplies.

We stayed at the Army Transit camp, which is considered to be the world’s highest military transit camp situated at an altitude of 15,768 ft. The medical aid that we received was at the world’s highest functional hospital.

Since I hadn’t been feeling well when we started from Keylong the day before, as soon as we reached the Pang Transit camp, the guy suffering from AMS and I went to the MI room. We were accompanied by the other four in the group. It turns out that everyone was low on oxygen except me, mainly because I was eating light and drinking lots of water. Funny how things work out!  Some of us were having glucose water, which the doc said we shouldn’t have. The idea is to store the energy and not get burned out too fast. Also having a Diamox as a precautionary measure at Keylong or Jispa is a good idea.

Pang to Morey plains to Debring (About 50 Km)

We started early from Pang, by now we all were professionals at packing our saddle bags and strapping them on to our bikes. Water bottles – check, air pressure – check, jackets & eye gear – check, Pillion – check. There was a comfy rhythm in which everything fell into place.

Interestingly on trips like these the group dynamics builds and many roles emerge voluntarily, someone takes up the responsibility of being the  – Planner, Timekeeper, Funny Guy, Safety guy, Inventory keeper and so on. Especially on a ride like this when you push your endurance to the limits, being in a group helps. In spite of all the dangers involved, the Manali-Leh highway rewards you with great friends and spectacular memories.

So, we were off to Karu today, and we were stuck in a traffic jam within 10 min from exiting the transit camp. I guess everyone at Pang decided to leave together. There were trucks, four wheelers and lots of bikes, on both sides of a narrow road. We wriggled our way thru and within 8km we reached the starting of Morey plains.

Morey Plains’ is Phenomenal. It is a flat distance of 45 Km situated at an altitude of more than 15800 ft, a big change from the passes we were climbing and descending over the last few days. The tarmac roads were being constructed and we got about 5 km of  smooth roads. After that it was mostly like a dirt race track made by the vehicles passing through this stretch. The average speed at this altitude is not high, so one feels like you are shifting in space in slow motion.

The battery on my ipod had run out long ago, and with the helmets and other jingbang, it’s not easy to talk to the rider. Actually, by now there isn’t much to say. So you are forced to keep silent, a difficult task for me in ordinary circumstances.

Many times one has heard that people come to India for soul searching, or people going to the Art of living course or Vipasna. When we were in Pune, we met people who had enrolled into the Osho ashram and even Elizabeth in Eat, Pray Love comes to find inner peace. To all these people, all I can say is – Ride down to leh. It’s a better, more fun way – I promise. Like they say ‘In silence, find thy self’.

Jokes apart, this is actually true. Being with yourself makes one focus on what’s important, who one really is – you know, the good stuff. It’s easy to get caught up in the nitty-gritty details of the daily grind of life, back home.

I read this sometime back and it kind of sums up what I want to say, “I travel because it makes more sense to me than not travelling. I travel because a breath taking landscape is hands down worth a 15 hour flight. I travel because I want to have a broader and deeper perspective of life. I travel because I love it.

 

(c) Photographs by Sharninder Khera and Nitin Joshi

A Pillion’s Leh Travelogue: Where it all started

Let’s be totally honest, when you hear stories about going to Leh on a bike there is a little part of you that says, I wanna do that some day. And if these stories are relayed to you every few weeks for 3 years or so – nothing can stop you from taking the trip.

My trip to Leh was a result of just that, a persuasive husband and his love for biking.

As a pillion rider I have a couple of new tales to add to the Chronicles of our Road Trip. But before I start let me just say a Big  Thanks to my dear husband and my friends for organizing a ride on what they call The Road to Heaven.

This was not my first ever long bike trip. The longest I’ve travelled was a three day trip from Pune to Ganpatipule with a day stop-over in between. This was a six day trip  as we were planning to fly back because we didn’t have enough leave. I am sure this was gonna be a little bit more exciting!!
The plan was simple, 6 people4 bikes. Ride down to Leh from Delhi via Manali. Take a couple of hundred snaps. Spend the last 2 days in Leh for sightseeing and fly back to Delhi. And all of 6 days to do it!

The route was essentially – Delhi – Panchkula –Mandi – Manali – Rohtang Pass – Tandi – Keylong – Jispa – ZingZing Bar – Baralacha La (Pass) – Bharatpur – Sarchu – Ghata loops – Nakee La – LachLung La – Pang – Morey Planes – Tanglang La – Upshi – Karu – Leh- IGI Delhi.

Luckily for us we stuck to the plan and had just a couple of minor hiccups, because no matter how much one plans, trip like these – the climate, road conditions and The All Mighty are very unpredictable.

I shall try to recount my side of the story in A PILLION’S LEH TRAVELOGUE series, hope you guys enjoy it as much as I enjoyed the trip.

(c) Photographs by Sharninder Khera and Nitin Joshi